Nutrition, energy balance & healthy ageing

Despite improvements in standards of living and medical care, the number of people affected by obesity and related non-communicable diseases (NCDs) continues to grow.

NCDs result from a combination of different factors, including environmental and behavioural ones. Poor nutrition worldwide reduces quality of life, drives up healthcare costs and can lead to premature death.

In this context, it is not only critical to meet nutritional requirements to manage health and well-being but also to carry this out in a sustainable way is vital to keep the growing global population well-nourished and healthy.

Preventive measures such as nutrition education and dietary recommendations can limit the dramatic rise in chronic metabolic diseases and, therefore, reduce the impact of these on the health and longevity of the overall population.

Nutrition education and recommendations to prevent and manage chronic disease represent one of ILSI Europe’s core activities. We aim to resolve gaps in scientific knowledge in the fields of dietary components, energy balance, early-life nutrition and healthy ageing.

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EXPERTS INVOLVED

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ACTIVITIES

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EUROPEAN PROJECTS
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SPEAKERS IN INTERNATIONAL EVENTS
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PUBLICATIONS
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WORKSHOP

ILSI EUROPE AT 13TH EUROPEAN NUTRITION CONFERENCE (FENS2019)

ILSI Europe was a major contributor to the programme of the 13th European Nutrition Conference held in October, providing 18 speakers and organising six sessions, which attracted more than 600 participants.

ILSI Europe’s President and FENS Co-Chair Prof Philip Calder welcomed the meeting, organised by the Nutrition Society and hosted this year by its irish Section.

Success stories 2019

INCREASING THE INTAKE OF ARACHIDONIC ACID (ARA) MAY BENEFIT MUSCLE AND COGNITIVE HEALTH

Calder and colleagues showed that there appear to be some marked benefits for adults of increased ARA intake. ARA is a type of fatty acid obtained from meat products including chicken, beef, pork and fish. In people, it is present in the membranes of the body’s cells, especially the brain, muscles and liver. This study suggested that boosting ARA intake may have positive effects on muscle and cognitive health that could be particularly relevant in an ageing population. This activity was supported by our Early Nutrition and Long-Term Health and Nutrient Intake Optimisation Task Forces.

Read the publication on our website.

THE NEED FOR FURTHER ASSESSMENT OF DIETARY TREATMENT OF GESTATIONAL DIABETES

Through randomised controlled trials, Garcia-Patterson and co-workers observed high levels of heterogeneity in women with gestational diabetes following a controlled diet. Such dietary interventions may have an impact on the response to nutritional management of the condition and, thus, should be further addressed in future research. This activity was supported by the Early Nutrition and Long-Term Health and Obesity and Diabetes Task Forces.

Read the publication on our website.

PROVIDING EVIDENCE BASE FOR POPULATION TARGETED PROTEIN INTAKE FOR MUSCLE HEALTH

This activity should help us to identify the optimum protein intake across potentially vulnerable populations. Its objective is also to enhance understanding of the implications of a shift towards more plant-based and environmentally friendly diets particularly in terms of muscle health.

EXPERIMENTAL GINGIVITIS: FURTHER INVESTIGATION ON RESISTANCE AND RESILIENCE IS NEEDED

Plaque accumulation and gingival responses to poor oral hygiene vary from person to person. Some people are resistant to the development of such plaque, while others, when oral hygiene practices are restored, may recover to their initial state (resilience). In this systemic review supported by the Health Benefits Assessment Task Force, Zemouri and co-workers looked for microbiological, immunological and biochemical biomarkers of resistance and resilience to experimental gingivitis, highlighting the need for future investigation into the topic.

Read the publication on our website.